Risk Warning: CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. The vast majority of retail client accounts lose money when trading in CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.
CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. The vast majority of retail client accounts lose money when trading in CFDs with this provider.CFD-retail client accounts generally lose money. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.
The week’s main news will be the Reserve Bank of New Zealand meeting on monetary policy. While most central banks are starting to discuss an imminent easing move openly, the RBNZ remains hawkish on the possibility of further tightening. Australia, Japan, and the Eurozone will release inflation data. Inflationary pressures are expected to rise in Australia, while consumer prices in the EU area and Japan are forecasted to decline. Another important inflation report will be the US PCE report, the preferred inflation gauge for the US Fed. Also, several countries will release GDP data for the first month of 2024 this week.
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Investors and traders will watch closely this week for new inflation data in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Switzerland. Inflationary pressures are expected to decline further in the United States, which may increase the likelihood that the FOMC will cut rates soon. But any signs of recovering price pressures could push bets on a rate cut further into the future. In the UK, inflation data is expected to show no signs of a slowdown, likely forcing the Bank of England (BoE) to hold high rates for longer. Inflation is likely to fall in Switzerland, which may lead to a softer stance of the SNB. Also coming out this week will be GDP data from Japan, the Eurozone, and the UK. It is the broadest measure of economic activity and a key indicator of the economy’s health. And, of course, traders should not miss the data on the labor market in the UK and Australia. A strong labor market will push the probability of a rate cut further away, which, as a rule, has a positive effect on the national currency.
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In terms of economic events, this week will be much calmer than the previous one. The main events of the week will be the meeting of the Central Bank of Australia, inflation data in Germany and China, and speeches by representatives of central banks. The RBA is expected to leave interest rates unchanged at its first meeting of the year. Comments from the European Central Bank (ECB), Bank of England (BoE), and US Fed officials will be closely watched by investors. Concerns about rising tensions in the Middle East will also remain at the forefront after the United States launched retaliatory strikes late Friday against Iran-backed militants in Iraq and Syria following a drone attack in Jordan last weekend that killed three US service members. Also, traders shouldn’t forget about the US and European earning seasons.
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This week promises to be volatile due to a lot of important events. The US Nonfarm Payrolls is the week’s main event, as it is one of the most significant parameters for the Fed’s monetary policy decision. Economists believe the labor market will add 177,000 jobs, slowing from 216,000 in January. Traders should pay special attention to the interest rate decisions from the Bank of England (BoE) and the US Fed. Both central banks are expected to keep rates unchanged. Traders should also pay special attention to the inflation data in Europe and Australia – a slight decline is expected in both. Investors should also keep a close eye on the OPEC+ meeting, which significantly impacts oil pricing. Also, do not forget about the earning season in the United States. This week, companies such as Apple (AAPL), Alphabet (GOOG), Amazon (AMZN), Meta Platforms (META), and many others will report.
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It’s going to be a busy week. The major central banks begin their first meetings of 2024, and the People’s Bank of China (PBoC), Bank of Japan (BoJ), Bank of Canada (BoC), Norges Bank, and ECB will be the first to meet. PMI data will show how the global economy is doing at the start of the year. Traders should not forget about the situation in the Middle East, where the growing geopolitical situation has a strong impact on oil and gold prices. In addition, a number of data on the US economy will be released this week, namely the GDP data for Q4 last year, as well as the PCE deflator, which is the preferred inflation indicator for the US Fed. Also, the US reporting season for the 4th quarter of last year should not be missed: Netflix (NFLX), Tesla (TSLA), and Intel (INTC) are expected to report this week.
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This week is full of economic events. The main focus of investors will be the inflation data in major economies such as the United Kingdom, Japan, Canada, Germany, and the Eurozone. Traders will also focus on labor market data in Australia and the UK. In China, the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) will publish several economic indicators, the main of which will be the GDP report and industrial production data. Also, this week is the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Investors will also focus on corporate earnings, which will be reported for the 4th quarter.
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This week, traders will be mainly interested in inflation data in the United States, Australia, Switzerland, and China, as well as the inflation rate in Tokyo, which is considered to be a leading indicator of overall inflation in the country. Consumer prices are expected to decline in all countries except the United States. In turn, rising inflation in the US may push back the Federal Reserve’s plans to cut rates this spring. The UK will publish several economic data, the main of which will be the GDP report. Analysts expect modest growth, but there is also a possibility that the economy could contract or show zero growth for the second month in a row. It also marks the start of the fourth quarter earnings season, with numerous large US banks reporting on Friday.
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The US Nonfarm payrolls report and US FOMC meeting minutes will be the main events of this week. The publication of the minutes may reinforce the view that moderate policy easing (3 steps of 0.25%) is needed in 2024. Friday’s unemployment report will show the state of the US labor market. A strong labor market is positive for the US dollar, which has suffered in recent weeks on expectations that central banks will start cutting rates this year. Also, during the week, the European countries will publish new inflation data, increasing the volatility of the currency pairs with the euro.
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This week will not be busy because of the Christmas and New Year holidays. As a rule, bankers and investors go on vacation at this time, so the volatility in the last week of the year is below average. But there are still events to watch out for. The investors’ attention will be directed to Singapore inflation data, US labor market data, and Switzerland’s KOF barometer. Also, it’s worth paying attention to the economic data from Japan.
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Friday’s Nonfarm Payrolls report for November will be the focus of investors’ attention. Economists expect the US economy to have added 180,000 jobs in November after 150,000 jobs were created in October. A strong report will make it less likely that the Fed will begin easing its restrictive monetary policy sooner than expected, which could impede a further rally in stocks. Also, this week’s main events will be the interest rate meetings of the central banks of Australia and Canada. Both RBA and BoC are expected to leave interest rates unchanged, which will reinforce investor confidence that rates are at their peak. Investors should also pay attention to the Eurozone and Japanese GDP quarterly data as well as the inflation rate in Germany and Switzerland. Fed policymakers will not be speaking or commenting this week.
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The Reserve Bank of New Zealand will meet on Wednesday, where the official monetary rate is expected to be kept at 5.5%. The OPEC+ group surprised the market last Wednesday by postponing its scheduled November 26 meeting until November 30 after producers failed to reach a consensus on production levels. This increased interest in the current OPEC+ meeting, where oil production cuts will be discussed. Thursday’s US PCE inflation report is likely to bolster the case for the Federal Reserve to stop raising rates. Also, this week, inflation data will be released in the Eurozone, which is expected to indicate that price pressures eased again in November. However, despite signs of slowing inflation, the minutes of the ECB’s most recent meeting last Thursday showed that officials believe they should be prepared to raise rates again if necessary. There will also be many speeches this week by central bank officials that are worth watching closely.
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This holiday week’s main event will be the November minutes of the US Federal Reserve meeting. Recent signs of falling inflation have fueled hopes that the US central bank has ended its tightening cycle, and investors will be studying the minutes for clues as to where policymakers are leaning at future meetings. Traders’ interest will also be piqued by the UK’s autumn budget and Canada’s Consumer Price Index. Japan will present its October consumer price index, and the Bank of Sweden will hold monetary policy meetings. At the end of the week, on Sunday, there will be a meeting of OPEC+ countries, where new production norms will be presented, so leaving positions before the weekend will be a very risky decision.
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This week, the main focus of investors will be on inflation data in the leading countries — the Eurozone, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Inflationary pressures are expected to ease in the US and the UK, while in the Eurozone, inflation may surprise in terms of growth. Also, the focus of traders will be data on China. The Chinese economy is still struggling to recover from the pandemic, and the next weak data may provoke new rumors about stimulus. Also, this week, many Central Bank speeches are expected, which may give some clues ahead of the last bank meetings of the year.
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The current week is expected to be quieter than the previous one, as there will be little important economic news on key economies. The main event will be the Reserve Bank of Australia’s monetary policy meeting, where there is a high probability of a 0.25% rate hike. Investors will also closely analyze Friday’s UK GDP data, where there may be surprises in the form of negative values for the 3rd quarter. US Fed Chief Jerome Powell is scheduled to speak on Wednesday and Thursday this week at various events in Washington, DC. Any speech by Powell is fraught with increased market volatility, especially recently when rate decisions are becoming more and more essential. Traders should also pay attention to China’s inflation data, as well as New Zealand’s inflation expectations report. These data could affect Asian stock markets as well as global risk sentiment.
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The main events this week will be data on the labor market (Nonfarm Payrolls) in the United States, as well as interest rate decisions of the central banks of the United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan. Analysts forecast that the Bank of England (BoE) and the Federal Reserve (RBA) will keep rates unchanged. The Bank of Japan will also leave interest rates unchanged, but there could be changes in the management of the YCC yield curve, leading to a stronger yen. Investors should also keep a close eye on European data, especially inflation and GDP. Also, this week, there will be a lot of macroeconomic statistics on manufacturing PMI and services PMI data, which will give an indication of global economic trends in key economies.
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This week is full of important economic events. The central banks of Europe and Canada will hold monetary policy and interest rate meetings. Australia and Singapore will release new inflation data. Market watchers will also get an update on the state of the US economy, including third-quarter GDP data and the Fed’s preferred measure of inflation, the core PCE index. All of this will take place against the backdrop of the ongoing reporting season, where Microsoft (MSFT), Alphabet (GOOGL), Amazon (AMZN), Meta Platforms (META), and Apple (AAPL) will be reporting this week.
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Geopolitical tensions will remain at the forefront this week. Any hints of further escalation of the conflict in the Middle East will have a direct impact on the US dollar, gold, and oil prices. Also, the focus for investors will be on the consumer price index in the major economies (Eurozone, United Kingdom, Canada, New Zealand, and Japan). There will also be plenty of economic statistics on China, with Q3 GDP data worth a special look. Several US Federal Reserve officials will speak this week. Investors should not forget about the 3rd quarter US earnings season. Companies due to report earnings next week include Tesla, Netflix, and Johnson & Johnson.
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The main events this week will be data on the labor market (Nonfarm Payrolls) in the United States. The report will show whether the Fed’s series of aggressive rate hikes is having an impact on the labor market. Economists expect the economy to have added 163,000 jobs last month, slowing slightly from 187,000 in August. A stronger-than-expected reading could underline the Fed’s ‘higher for longer’ stance, weighing on markets. The central banks of Australia and New Zealand will hold regular meetings. Both banks are expected to leave rates unchanged. It should also be noted that The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies (OPEC+) are scheduled to meet on Wednesday to agree on production quotas for November and December. Also, several Fed and ECB policymakers are scheduled to speak this week, including Fed Chief Jerome Powell and ECB President Kristine Lagarde. There will be a lot of macroeconomic statistics on manufacturing and services PMI data, which will give an indication of global economic trends in key economies.
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This week will be less eventful than the previous week, but there are still a few important economic events that investors should pay attention to. The main event this week will be the publication of data on the PCE index, which is on the US Federal Reserve’s list of monitored inflation indicators. With energy prices rising in recent months, inflationary pressures worldwide are starting to build again, just as central banks have done a lot of work and are at the end of their tightening cycle. Rising energy prices are not the Fed’s only cause for concern, however. Exceptionally high consumption levels have incentivized policymakers to keep the door open for further rate hikes. Therefore, good orders and CB consumer confidence data will be important to analyze. A potentially big concern for investors is a possible government shutdown, as Congress has no time to agree on a spending cut bill before midnight on September 30. In the Eurozone, inflation data will help determine whether rates will remain unchanged or rise further. Also, Australian inflation data for August may prompt the RBA to hike rates again if the core rate rises as forecast.
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The Forex market is in for another volatile week. This week, investors should focus on the Interest Rate Decisions from the central banks of the United States, United Kingdom, Japan, Switzerland, Norway, and China. Interest rate hikes are expected from the Bank of England, Swiss National Bank, and Norges Bank. In the United States, Japan, and China, no change is expected, but it will be very important to analyze inflation forecasts. Special attention should be paid to Jerome Powell’s remarks at Wednesday’s press conference after the interest rate announcement. There will also be many inflation reports this week, particularly in the Eurozone, Canada, the UK, Japan, and Singapore. Also, on Friday, there will be a lot of data on business activity.
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Despite Monday being a bank holiday in the United States and Canada, this economic week is quite busy. Investors will primarily be watching the central bank meetings in Australia and Canada. Both central banks are expected to leave rates unchanged, but there may be surprises. Secondly, investors will have the opportunity to hear several Fed representatives speak about the future policy of the US central bank. Thirdly, China’s trade balance data will show whether China was able to recover from the previous balance contraction. Analysts put a disappointing forecast. The data on business activity in the service sector will give an indication of whether traders should expect service inflation to intensify further.
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The US Nonfarm Payrolls report will become the week’s main event as it is the most important data for the Fed’s monetary policy decision. Economists believe the labor market will add 169,000 jobs in August after 187,000 in July. The unemployment rate is expected to hold steady at 3.5%, while average hourly earnings growth is also forecast to remain unchanged at 4.4% y/y in August. The data on the preliminary rate of inflation in the Eurozone should also be on the trader’s list since the ECB meeting is two weeks away. Also, investors should not miss the Manufacturing PMI data in various countries. Falling below 50 is a serious slowdown in the sector, which usually leads to a recession.
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This week, investors will focus on US Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell’s speech at the Central Bank’s annual conference in Jackson Hole, where he will share his views on the future trajectory of interest rates. Fed executives reiterated that there is still much work to be done in their fight against inflation. Investors should also keep an eye on the People’s Bank of China’s interest rate decision. Chinese banks unexpectedly lowered interest rates last week, and expectations are growing that PBoС will cut the prime rate on Monday. Also, Eurozone countries will publish important data on manufacturing and services PMI that will show the health of the economy during a period of high-interest rates.
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This week, investors’ attention will focus on the FOMC minutes of the July meeting, which will give clues as to how the US Fed will behave at its September meeting. The UK will publish data on inflation, where consumer price pressures are expected to decline slightly. In Europe, an essential second-quarter GDP report and inflation data will be released. The central banks of New Zealand and Norway hold monetary policy meetings, where rates are expected to remain unchanged. Traders should also not miss the consumer price index data in Japan and Canada.
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It will be a relatively quiet week for economic events. The main focus of investors will be the US inflation rate data. Economists expect the annual inflation rate to be moderate and show little change. The UK is due to release monthly GDP data for June and the overall second quarter. China will release trade data on Tuesday and inflation data for July on Wednesday, which is expected to show a decline in consumer prices, amid concerns about the outlook for the world’s second-largest economy.
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This week’s main events will be data on the labor market (Nonfarm Payrolls) in the United States, as well as interest rate meetings of the central banks of England and Australia. Analysts forecast that both the Bank of England (BoE) and the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) will raise interest rates by 0.25%. Also, this week there will be a lot of macroeconomic statistics on manufacturing PMI and services PMI data which will give an indication of global economic trends in key economies for the first month of the third quarter.
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The main focus of investors this week will be on the meetings of the central banks of the United States, the Eurozone, and Japan. Both the Fed and the ECB are expected to raise rates by 0.25%, while Japan is not expected to make any changes. However, it should be united that there is still a slight possibility of yield curve control adjustments. Also worth watching this week is the PCE Price Index, which is the US Fed’s preferred inflation indicator. And let’s not forget the second quarter reporting season in the United States. Tech giants will be reporting this week.
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Inflation data will continue to dominate the economic agenda this week. In Canada, the UK, and New Zealand, inflation is expected to decline, while inflationary pressures are expected to intensify in the Eurozone and Japan. Traders should also keep a close eye on China’s economic data. With deflationary forces intensifying, weak economic data could lead to massive stimulus. Several big companies are due to report this week such as BAC, MS, LMT, SCHW, TSLA, NFLX, IBM, GS, USB, TSM, and JNJ. Volatility on stock indices will increase as the reporting period moves towards the middle.
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Last week, investors were mainly focused on the FOMC minutes and Nonfarm Payrolls data. A strong labor market report increases the likelihood of another two hikes by the US Fed. This week, the main focus of investors will be on inflation data in the United States, Germany, and China. Also, this week the Central Banks of Canada and New Zealand will meet on interest rate decisions. Analysts expect New Zealand’s Central Bank to leave rates unchanged, while the Bank of Canada may resort to another 0.25% rate hike. Investors should also keep on the start of the US earning period for the second quarter of 2023. JPMorgan Chase (JPM), Citigroup (C), and Wells Fargo (WFC) will report second-quarter earnings Friday. Analysts expect the results to be worse because of low earnings as well as the layoffs of thousands of employees amid the banking crisis.
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This week promises to be volatile due to a lot of important events. The US Nonfarm Payrolls is the week’s main event, as it is one of the most important parameters for the Fed’s monetary policy decision. Continued strength in the labor market could strengthen the US Federal Reserve’s stance on further rate hikes. The FOMC protocol on Wednesday will give investors some insight into how FED policymakers see the future trajectory of interest rates as markets remain focused on the prospect of a recession. The Reserve Bank of Australia will hold an interest rate meeting. Analysts expect the RBA to leave the rate unchanged because the latest inflation data showed a decline.
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There will be several important events in the coming week. The main event will be the inflation data in Europe, Canada, and Australia. Inflationary pressures are expected to fall everywhere, but there may be surprises as the fall in global inflation slows. On Wednesday, there will be an ECB forum to which the heads of the central banks of the United States, Japan, and the UK are invited. Also, this week, the US and UK GDP data will be released. This data will show how the economy works in a period of high-interest rates. Investors will also get an update on the possible future trajectory of interest rates on Friday after the release of May data on the Personal Consumption Price Index, the Federal Reserve’s preferred measure of inflation.
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This week, investors should focus on UK, Japan, Singapore, and Hong Kong inflation data. Analysts expect inflationary pressures to decrease in all cases. Also, this week there will be meetings of the central banks of England, Switzerland, China, and Norway. The Bank of England, Swiss National Bank, and Norges Bank are expected to raise interest rates, while the People’s Bank of China may cut rates. The speeches of the head of the US Federal Reserve to Congress, as well as speeches of the FOMC officials, are also worth paying attention to. A hawkish bias by politicians could trigger a sell-off in stock indices and give a new boost to the US dollar.
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This week, the main focus is on the meeting of the central banks of Canada, Australia, and India. All central banks are expected to keep interest rates unchanged. China will publish inflation data. A slowdown in inflation could trigger interest rate and/or reserve requirement cuts this month. This data has a strong effect on Asian indices. Also, a number of countries (Japan, Australia, and the Eurozone) will release GDP data.
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This week promises to be volatile due to a lot of important events. The US Nonfarm Payrolls is the week’s main event, as it is one of the most essential parameters for the Fed’s monetary policy decision. Economists believe the US employment report remains robust in May. The stronger the labor market, the more likely the US Federal Reserve will raise rates in June. The Eurozone will release its latest inflation estimate on Thursday, with economists expecting inflationary pressure to decrease. Investors should also keep a close eye on the CPI data in Australia, where there could be a surprise in the form of a new rise in inflation.
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Investors will focus this week on FOMC minutes to get clues whether the US Federal Reserve will raise rates again next month or will take a pause. US personal income and spending data and the PCE Price Index, which the Fed considers adjusting policy, will also be important economic data. The UK and Europe manufacturing PMI data should also focus on the list. Investors should also closely monitor the New Zealand Reserve Bank meeting as the RBNZ is not yet finished with monetary policy tightening. And, of course, traders should not forget the burning issue of the US debt ceiling. If politicians do not reach an agreement by June 1st, the US could default.
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Regarding economic events this week, inflation data in the Eurozone, Canada, and Japan are the first things to look out for. Canada is expected to continue to see inflationary pressures lower, and the Eurozone is expected to remain unchanged, while Japan is expected to see consumer prices rise. The Eurozone will release revised first-quarter GDP data Tuesday, and economists expect the bloc’s economy to grow slightly.
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This week will be less economically eventful than the previous one. The main event will be the CPI data (inflation rate) in the United States. This data will be closely watched as investors assess whether the Federal Reserve will be able to hold off on raising rates next month. If inflation shows signs of resiliency or growth, the stock market could react negatively as the Fed could continue raising rates in June. The Bank of England will hold its monetary policy meeting on Thursday. The BoE is expected to raise interest rates by another 25 basis points, continuing its fight against inflation. Also, on Thursday, China will release inflation data showing how the economy feels during the recovery from the pandemic. The focus of investors should also be on the speeches of the Fed and the ECB officials.
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This week promises to be volatile due to a lot of important events. The US Nonfarm Payrolls is the week’s main event, as it is one of the most significant parameters for the Fed’s monetary policy decision. Economists believe the US employment report remains robust in April. Traders should pay special attention to the Fed interest rate decision and the FOMC Statement. The Fed is expected to raise interest rates another 25 basis points on Wednesday amid still lingering inflation and growing concerns about the economic outlook.
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This week’s main events will be the Bank of Japan meeting and the PCE index data, which is considered a more important inflation indicator for the US Fed. The new Governor of the Bank of Japan, Kazuo Ueda, will hold his first meeting on Friday, and while analysts do not expect any changes to the Central Bank’s ultra-soft monetary policy, they are on alert for possible surprises. The US PCE Price Index is expected to fall, while the core index is expected to remain high. Also, this week, GDP data in the US and several European countries will be released. And do not forget about the earnings season. Some major technology companies such as Microsoft (MSFT), Alphabet (GOOGL), Amazon (AMZN), and (META) are expected to report earnings this week.
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This week the focus for traders will be on inflation data in Canada, Japan, the UK, and New Zealand. Most countries expect inflationary pressures to ease, but there could be surprises. The first-quarter earnings season picks up with results expected from several major companies, including Sachs (GS), Morgan Stanley (MS), Bank of America (BAC) as well as Netflix (NFLX), Tesla (TSLA), IBM (IBM), and Johnson & Johnson (JNJ). On Tuesday, China will release a range of economic data, including first-quarter gross domestic product, retail sales, and industrial production for March, with market participants hoping for more clarity on the uneven recovery of the world’s second-largest economy. Investors should also not miss the speeches by Fed officials, who may give clues as to the US Central Bank’s future plans.
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This week, the main focus of investors will be on inflation data in the United States as well as US FOMC Meeting Minutes. Analysts expect a decline in US inflation, while the FOMC protocol will be examined for further interest rate developments. The Bank of Canada will hold its policy meeting on Wednesday and is expected to leave rates unchanged. Central bankers and finance ministers will meet on Monday in Washington as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund begin their spring meeting.
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The main event of the week will be the US Nonfarm Payrolls report. Economists expect the US economy to add 238,000 jobs in March. The report will be published on Good Friday, when most financial markets worldwide will be closed. Also, this week there will be meetings of the central banks of Australia (RBA) and New Zealand (RBNZ), where further rate hikes are expected, but there may be surprises. OPEC countries will meet on Monday to discuss further plans for oil production levels. Other economic events will have little impact on pricing, but that does not mean they should be overlooked.
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On the economic calendar, this week will be much calmer than the previous one, with Friday’s main event being the PCE core price index, the Fed’s favorite measure of inflation. It accelerated in January, raising fears about the prospect of a more hawkish Fed policy. But the situation in the banking sector has changed the mood of policymakers, and so far, the situation has not fully stabilized. Quarterly US GDP data will be released Thursday, showing how the economy is doing during a period of high rates. On Friday, the Eurozone will release inflation data, and on Wednesday, consumer price data from Australia will be released. Business data in China will also be closely watched as market watchers try to gauge the strength of the recovery in the world’s second-largest economy after pandemic restrictions were lifted.
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This week will be full of important events. On Wednesday is the important monetary policy meeting of the Fed, where policymakers will announce their interest rate decision. Market pricing is leaning toward a quarter-point interest rate hike, which would raise borrowing costs to 5.00%. The Bank of England (BoE) and the Swiss National Bank (SNB) will hold their meetings on Thursday. Also, inflation data from the UK, Canada, and Japan will be released during the week. The volatile week will finish with data on business activity in different countries’ manufacturing and service sectors.
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On Friday, startup-focused lender SVB Financial Group became the largest bank to collapse since the 2008 financial crisis. The decline in SVB stock, which began Thursday, has spread to other US and European banks. This caused panic among investors, which could intensify if people start withdrawing their deposits from banks on Monday, fearing a 2008 scenario. Therefore, this week the main investors’ attention will be focused on how the situation in the banking sector will develop further. Also, this week, important inflation data will be released in the United States and Europe. The main focus will be on the core CPI data. The UK and Australia will publish their labor market reports, which may affect central banks’ monetary policy. On Thursday, the ECB will hold its monetary policy meeting, at which a 0.5% rate hike is expected.
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It will be a volatile week. This week’s main events for investors will be the US Nonfarm Payrolls and Interest Rate Decisions from the central banks of Japan, Canada, and Australia. The Bank of Canada is expected to keep the interest rate at the same level, while the Reserve Bank of Australia may raise rates by another 0.25%. In Japan, no change in monetary policy is forecast, but there may be surprises with the removal of yield curve top control. In the United States, Friday’s February employment report will be the last before the upcoming Fed meeting on March 21-22. The economy is expected to add 200,000 jobs last month. Before Friday’s jobs report, Powell will appear before Congress to present the central bank’s report on monetary policy. He will testify before the Senate on Tuesday and the House of Representatives on Wednesday.
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This week does not promise to be too volatile. But there are still a few economic events worth looking out for. Firstly, it’s inflation data in the Eurozone and Australia. Both are expected to see a decrease in inflationary pressures, but there may be surprises. There will also be a lot of manufacturing and service sector PMI statistics for the major economies released this week. This data is important for estimating the economy’s health at a time of high-interest rates. Wednesday will also be the release of China PMI data which will show how China’s economic recovery is going, which is affecting the Asia region. Investors should also keep an eye on quarterly GDP data for Canada, Switzerland, and India.
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The FOMC meeting minutes will be in focus this week amid renewed uncertainty about how high-interest rates might eventually rise in the central bank’s fight against inflation. Traders will also focus on the RBNZ’s interest rate decision on Wednesday. Most analysts believe the Central Bank of New Zealand will increase the rates by 0.50%. A strengthening of the national currency usually accompanies a rate hike. Also, the focus of traders will be inflation data from the Eurozone and Japan. The speech of the new Governor of the Bank of Japan will give more information about his stance on monetary policy. It also should be noted that at the end of this week, February 24 will be the anniversary of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, which could bring additional surprises in the form of new escalations.
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Investors and traders will be watching closely this week for new inflation data in the United States and the United Kingdom. Inflationary pressures are expected to decline further in the United States, which may increase the likelihood that the US Federal Reserve will not be categorical in raising rates further. In the UK, consumer prices are also expected to decline, but inflation is still projected to be above 10%. Also, this week, the Japanese government is about to appoint a new Central Bank Governor. Why is this important? The hawkish candidate is likely to change monetary policy in a tightening direction, leading to a sharp strengthening of the Japanese currency. Conversely, if the Bank of Japan, which is Kuroda’s current Governor, is chosen to be a soft-policy supporter, the Japanese yen could fall substantially against the dollar.
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In terms of economic events, this week will be much calmer than the previous one. The main events of the week will be the meeting of the Central Bank of Australia, the UK GDP data, inflation data in Germany and China, and speeches by representatives of central banks. In Australia, a 0.25% rate hike is expected as inflation jumped to its highest level in 33 years.
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This week promises to be volatile due to a lot of important events. The US Nonfarm Payrolls are the week’s main event, as it is one of the most significant parameters for the Fed’s monetary policy decision. Economists believe the labor market will add 193,000 jobs, slowing from 223,000 in January. Traders should pay special attention to the interest rate decision from the Bank of England, the ECB, and the US Fed.
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This week, the focus of traders will be on the Bank of Canada meeting, where a 0.25% rate hike is expected. This may be the last rate hike, as high rates are already starting to negatively affect the Canadian economy. The focus of traders’ attention should also be on inflation data in Asian countries. Tuesday will be full of important data on business activity in major economies that will show if companies have adjusted to high-interest rates. Technology companies Microsoft, Tesla, IBM, and Intel are due to report this week.
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This week is full of economic events. The main focus of investors will be on the Bank of Japan meetings and the inflation data in major economies such as the United Kingdom, Japan, Canada, Germany, and the Eurozone. Also, this week is the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. On the agenda are the cost of living crisis, the threat of natural disasters, extreme weather events, and geopolitics. Investors will also focus on corporate earnings, which will be reported for the 4th quarter.
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Last week, investors were mainly focused on the US Nonfarm Payrolls data and the FOMC minutes. The FOMC report showed that Fed policymakers increased the range of the final interest rate, while the Nonfarm report showed that the labor market remains resilient. Together, these two factors indicate that interest rates will rise further in the first half of 2023. This week the main events will be the consumer inflation data in the United States, Australia, and China. Analysts expect inflationary pressure in the US to decrease. Also, this week, there will be speeches by the heads of leading central banks. It also marks the start of the fourth quarter earnings season, with several large banks reporting on Friday.
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The US Nonfarm Payrolls report and US FOMC meeting minutes will be the main events of this week. The latest FOMC report showed that the US Federal Reserve plans to slow the pace of interest rate hikes. If the current rate stays the same, it may give a new impetus to stock indices. Friday’s unemployment report will show the state of the US labor market. A strong labor market is positive for the dollar. Also, this week, there will be a meeting of OPEC+ countries. The oil market remains very tight due to the situation in China and the restrictions imposed against Russian oil. Also, during the week, the European countries will publish new inflation data, increasing the volatility in the currency pairs with the euro.
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This week will not be busy because of the Christmas and New Year holidays. As a rule, bankers and investors go on vacation at this time, so the volatility in the last week of the year is below average. But there are still events to watch out for. The investors’ attention will be focused on crude oil reserves on Thursday, which has a significant impact on oil prices. Also, it’s worth paying attention to the economic data from Japan at the beginning of the trading week.
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The economic calendar is quieter this week ahead of the Christmas holidays. The ultra-dovish Bank of Japan is expected to stick with negative interest rates. Canada and Japan will publish the last inflation data of the year, where there could be surprises with a new round of inflationary pressures. In the United States, data on GDP, PCE, the real estate sector, and consumer confidence will give a new insight into the strength of the economy as fears of a recession intensify.
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This will be the most economically rich week of the month and maybe of the whole quarter. The world’s leading central banks (US Fed, ECB, BoE, SNB, and Norwegian Central Bank) will hold monetary policy meetings where further interest rate hikes are expected. The US inflation data on Tuesday will shed light on the Fed’s plans, setting the tone for US indices and stocks for the rest of the year and beyond. Leading European countries will also update inflation data. In addition, several countries will release labor market, Manufacturing PMI, and GDP data.
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This week promises to be a quiet one. Fed policymakers will not be speaking or commenting. Therefore, the main events this week will be the interest rate meetings of the central banks of Australia and Canada. Both RBA and BOC are expected to raise rates by 0.25%. Also, this week, OPEC+ ministers are expected to decide on production targets, which may significantly impact oil price formation. At the end of the week, China will release inflation data, which, along with data on the trade balance, will help estimate the economy’s situation.
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The US Nonfarm Payrolls report will become the week’s main event as it is the most important data for the Fed’s monetary policy decision. Economists predict that non-sector employment will decline, making it more likely that the Fed should slow the rate hikes. Conversely, job growth indicates labor market strength, and the Fed could make another aggressive rate hike. The data on inflation in the Eurozone should also be on the trader’s list since the ECB meeting is two weeks away. Also, investors should take advantage of the Manufacturing PMI data in various countries. There will also be many speeches this week by central bank officials that are worth watching closely.
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Wednesday’s Federal Reserve meeting minutes will be the main event of the week ahead, and investors will be closely watching for any signs that the pace of rate hikes could slow down. New Zealand is expecting another interest rate hike by the RBNZ. Also, Wednesday’s PMI data will provide important information on the state of the global economy. And Friday will be the start of the most important shopping period of the year, which will be a key test for US retailers.
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This week, the main focus of investors will be on inflation data in the leading countries – Eurozone, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Japan. The Consumer Price level in Eurozone and Great Britain, which is at its high, is the most important. The UK government will finally announce its new budget plan on Thursday, and investors will be watching closely for market reactions. Also in the focus of traders will be data on China after Beijing loosened some of its strict pandemic restrictions on Friday, raising hopes for a surge in economic activity. In addition, this week will be the G20 meeting.
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The main focus of investors this week will be the US inflation data and the results of the midterm elections. US inflation data on Thursday could bring some insight into when the Federal Reserve might start slowing the rate hikes. There will be a midterm election in the United States on Tuesday. Many traders underestimate this election, but this event could lead to a split in the US government. There will also be a lot of central bankers’ speeches this week to keep an eye on. The week will end with important data on UK GDP.
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The main events this week will be data on the labor market (Nonfarm Payrolls) in the United States, as well as interest rate meetings of the Central Banks of the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia. Analysts forecast that the Bank of England (BoE) and the Federal Reserve (RBA) will raise interest rates by 0.75%. Investors should also keep a close eye on European data, especially inflation and GDP. Also, this week there will be a lot of macroeconomic statistics on manufacturing PMIs and services PMI data, which will give an indication of global economic trends in key economies.
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This week is full of important economic events. The central banks of Europe, Canada, and Japan will hold monetary policy and interest rate meetings. Australia, Singapore, and several European countries will release new inflation data. China will publish a bunch of macro statistics, including the third quarter GDP, just after Xi Jinping was re-elected for a third term. At the same time, investors should not forget the political situation in the UK, where there will be a battle for the position of the new Prime Minister. And all of this will take place against the backdrop of the ongoing reporting season, where Microsoft (MSFT), Alphabet (GOOGL), Amazon (AMZN), and Apple (AAPL) will be reporting this week.
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This week, the focus for investors will be on the consumer price Index in the major economies. There will also be plenty of economic statistics on China, with Q3 GDP data worth a special look. Several US Federal Reserve and ECB officials will speak this week. Investors should not forget about the 3rd quarter US earnings season. Companies due to report earnings next week include Tesla, Netflix, and Johnson & Johnson.
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This week, the main focus for traders will be the US inflation rate data. Economists are predicting a slight decline in inflation, which will allow investors to return to riskier assets on expectations that the Fed will be less aggressive in raising interest rates. The minutes of the Fed’s last meeting on Wednesday should indicate how officials feel about the economy and the inflation outlook. The UK is due to release monthly GDP data and labor market data. Oil prices will also remain in the spotlight after OPEC+ announced the largest production cuts since 2020. And at the end of the week, the banking sector will open the earning season for the third quarter in the United States.
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Global stock markets look set for another volatile week amid fears that higher interest rates will lead to problems in the economies. This week investors’ attention should be focused on the Interest Rate Decisions from the central banks of the United States, Great Britain, Japan, Canada, Switzerland and Norway. Elsewhere except Japan, interest rates are expected to rise by 0.5-0.75%.
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There are many Consumer Price Index (CPI) reports coming out this week for August. Germany, Spain, and the United States will publish their report on Tuesday, the United Kingdom will publish its report on Wednesday, France will publish its report on Thursday, and Italy, with the Eurozone, will publish their reports on Friday. Analysts forecast lower inflation in the US, while inflation in the UK and Europe is expected to be at the same level, although there may be surprises upwards.
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Despite Monday being a bank holiday in the US and Canada, this economic week is very busy. First of all, investors’ attention is focused on the situation in Europe around the Nord Stream pipeline. Secondly, the OPEC+ countries will hold an important meeting on Monday, where there could be surprises in the form of oil production cuts. The ECB will hold a monetary policy meeting on Wednesday, where an aggressive 0.75% rate hike is expected. The Central Banks of Australia and Canada also plan to raise rates. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell will speak at the Cato Institute conference on Thursday, and investors will be watching for any clues as to the Fed’s future plans. A number of countries will also release second-quarter GDP data, which is important for recessionary estimates. Also, don’t forget that Britain will announce the name of a new prime minister on Monday.
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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell’s speech became the last week’s main event following the annual Symposium in Jackson Hole. The US Nonfarm Payrolls report will become the week’s main event as it is the most important data for the Fed’s monetary policy decision. Economists believe the labor market will add 295,000 jobs in August after 528,000 in July. The data on the preliminary inflation rate in the Eurozone should also be on the trader’s list since the ECB meeting is two weeks away. Also, investors should not miss the Manufacturing PMI data in various countries. Falling below 50 is a serious slowdown in the sector, which usually leads to a recession.
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This week, investors will focus on US Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell’s speech at the Central Bank’s annual conference in Jackson Hole, where he will share his views on the future trajectory of interest rates. Fed executives reiterated that there is still much work to be done in their fight against inflation, pushing back against expectations of peak inflation. Investors should also keep an eye on the US GDP data as fears about the prospect of a recession persist. Also, on Tuesday, Eurozone countries will publish important data on manufacturing and services PMI.
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This week, investors will focus on US Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell’s speech at the Central Bank’s annual conference in Jackson Hole, where he will share his views on the future trajectory of interest rates. Fed executives reiterated that there is still much work to be done in their fight against inflation, pushing back against expectations of peak inflation. Investors should also keep an eye on the US GDP data as fears about the prospect of a recession persist. Also, on Tuesday, Eurozone countries will publish important data on manufacturing and services PMI.
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This week, investors will focus on the FOMC minutes of the July meeting, which will analyze for clues about the size of September rate hikes. The UK will publish data on inflation, which is expected to approach the 10% mark. In Europe, an important second-quarter GDP report will be released. The Central Banks of New Zealand and Norway hold monetary policy meetings where significant interest rate hikes are expected. Traders should also not miss the Consumer Price Index data in Japan and Canada, as well as the monetary policy meeting minutes from the Reserve Bank of Australia.
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A strong non-farm payrolls report on Friday dashed hopes that the Federal Reserve might tone down its aggressive campaign to rein in the highest inflation in decades. As long as the labor market remains strong, the Fed will seek to raise rates as much as possible so that it can have room to lower them when unemployment starts to rise, and the economy falls into recession. The likelihood of a 75 basis point Fed rate hike at the September meeting has increased even more. Signs that inflation still hasn’t peaked could affect expectations that the central bank could stop raising rates early next year, leading to a stock decline. The US stock indices traded mixed on Friday. The Dow Jones Index (US30) increased by 0.23% (+0.15% for the week), and the S&P 500 (US500) decreased by 0.16% (+0.80% for the week). The NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) lost 0.50% (+2.76% for the week).
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This week’s main events will be data on the labor market (Nonfarm Payrolls) in the United States and interest rate meetings of the Central Banks of England and Australia. Analysts forecast that both the Bank of England (BoE) and the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) will raise interest rates by 0.5%. Also, this week there will be a lot of macroeconomic statistics on manufacturing PMIs and services PMI data, which will indicate global economic trends in key economies for the first month of the third quarter. It should also be noted that it is the reporting season now – companies are showing their results for the previous quarter.
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The most important meeting of the Federal Reserve on monetary policy and interest rates will take place this week. The main question is whether the rate will be raised by 0.75% or 1%. Right now 80/20 probability in favor of a 75 basis point increase. The world’s biggest companies are reporting: Microsoft, Alphabet, Meta, Apple, and Amazon. At the end of the week, there will be a lot of data on the Consumer Price Index and GDP from different countries. While much of this will be retrospective, it may still hint at what will happen with the economy and the central bank’s behavior.
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This week investors’ attention should be focused on the ECB Interest Rate Decision as well as inflation data in leading countries. Rising inflation is always a reason for the central bank to tighten monetary policy, so high inflation is very often accompanied by an increase in the national currency. The European Central Bank is meeting on Thursday and the bank is expected to raise rates for the first time in a decade. The earning season is gaining momentum in the United States and Europe. Several blue chips are due to report this week. Traders should also keep a close eye on the oil market. According to preliminary information, US President Joe Biden has agreed with the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia Mohamed Bin Salman to pump more oil, so oil prices could be very volatile this week.
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Last week, investors were mainly focused on the FOMC minutes and Nonfarm Payrolls data. The FOMC minutes showed that the Fed will likely raise rates by 0.75% at the July meeting. A strong jobs report also boosts the prospect of a 75bp Fed hike. This week, the main focus of investors will be on inflation data in the United States and Germany. Also, this week the central banks of Canada and New Zealand will meet on interest rate decisions. Analysts are predicting interest rate hikes by 0.5% in both cases. Investors should also keep on the start of the US earning period for the second quarter of 2022.
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This week promises to be volatile due to a lot of significant events. The US Nonfarm Payrolls is the week’s main event, as it is one of the most important parameters for the Fed’s monetary policy decision. Economists believe the US employment report will be worse than the previous month, but the unemployment rate will not change. FOMC protocol on Wednesday will give investors some insight into how FED policymakers see the future trajectory of interest rates as markets remain focused on the prospect of a recession. The European Central Bank is to publish the minutes of its June meeting on Thursday when it announced plans to deliver its first interest rate hike. The Reserve Bank of Australia will hold an interest rate meeting. Analysts predict that the bank will raise the rate by 0.5%. As a rule, rising interest rates are accompanied by a strengthening national currency.
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There will be several important events in the coming week. The main event will be the data on the inflation rate in Europe. The ECB is planning its first rate hike in a long time at its July meeting, but a sharp rise in inflation may encourage policymakers to go for a more aggressive step. On Monday, starts a three-day forum with the main topic “Challenges for monetary policy in a rapidly changing world”. The forum will conclude with speeches by the heads of the Fed, the ECB, and the Bank of England on Wednesday, so investors should keep a close eye on that. Also, this week, the US and Canadian GDP data will be released. Of course, investors should not miss the meeting of OPEC+ countries, which can have a significant impact on oil prices.
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This week’s primary focus is Jerome Powell’s speech to Congress and ECB officials. Friday’s Eurozone inflation data showed a sharp increase in consumer prices, so now it is essential to see how aggressively the ECB will behave and whether there are discussions about a 0.5% rate hike at the July meeting. Also, the UK, Canada, and Japan will update the inflation data for May, while the Reserve Bank of Australia will publish the minutes of the monetary policy meeting.
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A week full of important events is coming. Investors will be most interested in the Fed interest rate meeting, expecting a 0.5% rate hike. Also, this week there will be meetings of the Bank of England and the Central Banks of Switzerland and Japan. The Bank of England is expected to raise rates for the fifth time in a row amid a growing cost of living crisis. Traders’ attention should also be focused on speeches by heads of central banks who often tell which sentiments prevail inside. Special attention should also be paid to the inflation data in Europe, which will be published at the end of the week.
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US stock indices increased yesterday and closed higher for the second day in a row amid gains in technology and energy stocks. The Dow Jones Index (US30) added 0.80% at the close of the day, and the S&P 500 Index (US500) increased by 0.95%. The NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) jumped by 0.94% yesterday. The US is currently facing an “unacceptable level of inflation,” Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said at Tuesday’s Senate Finance Committee hearing. At the hearing, Yellen praised the state of the economic recovery, which she said has been marked by strong economic growth and historically low unemployment, but added that challenges remain. The US economy faces macroeconomic challenges, Yellen said, including unacceptable levels of inflation, as well as headwinds from the impact of the pandemic on supply chains and the effects of supply-side disruptions in oil and food markets resulting from Russia’s aggression in Ukraine.
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At the close of the US stock market on Monday the Dow Jones index (US30) increased by 0.05%, and the S&P 500 index (US500) added 0.31%. The Technology Index NASDAQ (US100) increased by 0.40% yesterday. At the end of the day, all three indices closed in small plus. On Monday, the Federal Reserve announced that it would release the results of its annual stress test of the nation’s largest banks on June 23. Investors closely watch the test results, which examine how large bank portfolios would behave in a hypothetical recession. It shows how much capital banks would need to hold as a safety cushion in case of losses.
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At the close of the stock market on Friday the Dow Jones index (US30) decreased by 1.05% (+0.50% for the week), the S&P 500 (US500) fell by 1.63% (+0.76% for the week). The Technology Index NASDAQ (US100) lost 2.47% (+1.21% for the week). All three indices ended the week in small gains. Despite concerns about slowing economic growth and high inflation, the US economy added 390,000 jobs in May, better than expected. Weaker regional PMIs in May and a sharp drop in home sales suggest that higher interest rates, higher costs, and global uncertainty are beginning to undermine the momentum of the US recovery. However, the labor market is still a pillar.
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The economic calendar for the upcoming week is not as dense as the previous one, but this week is more serious in terms of the number of important events. The main event will be the CPI data (inflation rate) in the United States and China. Analysts expect the US Consumer Price Index to remain at the same level as the PCE index two weeks ago, indicating signs of a slowdown in price growth. The focus of investors should also be on the ECB and RBA meetings. The European Central Bank is becoming hawkish, but analysts believe there will be no significant rate hike at the current meeting. The Reserve Bank of Australia is likely to continue raising interest rates.
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The US stock market closed yesterday with an increase. The Dow Jones Index (US30) added 1.33% at the stock market’s close, while the S&P 500 Index (US500) jumped by 1.84%. The NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) increased by 2.69%. The Fed officials Brainard and Mester confirmed that the Fed is planning to raise the interest rate by 50 basis points at the next two meetings. This scenario is already priced in, so the indices continued to recover amid the absence of negative news on the economy. An important jobs report (nonfarm payrolls) will be released today. US private sector jobs added much less than expected in May, according to ADP, which could indicate labor demand is starting to slow amid higher interest rates and tighter financial conditions. This suggests that the US central bank is trying to reduce labor demand without raising the unemployment rate too high.
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The US stock market closed yesterday in red territory. At the stock market’s close, the Dow Jones Index (US30) decreased by 0.16%, while the S&P 500 Index (US500) lost 0.30%.The NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) was down 1.49%. Remarks by JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon about the economy raised new recession fears. In turn, the ISM manufacturing index and hawkish speeches of Fed officials yesterday were optimistic for the US dollar. Former New York Fed President William Dudley pointed out yesterday that the Fed needs to tighten financial conditions. The only way to do that is to raise interest rates substantially. Waller from the Fed said he supports tightening policy by another 50 basis points throughout several meetings. The ultra-hawkish Bullard noted that the current macroeconomic environment in the US is undermining the Fed’s confidence in inflation and that inflation expectations could lose support without action from the Fed, so aggressively raising rates to 3.5% is needed. As soon as possible, like this year.
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The US stock market closed yesterday in a negative area. At closing time on Friday Dow Jones (US30) decreased by 0.67% (-0.22% for the month), S&P 500 (US500) lost 0.63% (-0.56% for the month). Technology Index NASDAQ (US100) lost 0.41% yesterday (-0.63% for the month). All three indices were down on the month. Among the factors that put pressure on the US equity market was the fear that the high inflation would negatively affect corporate earnings as the Q2 earnings season is just around the corner.
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The US stock market did not trade yesterday due to the holiday. Nevertheless, index futures on Asian and European sessions demonstrated growth, so if there will be no sharp movements at the European session today, the US stock indices will open with a gap. European stock markets were mostly rising yesterday. German DAX (DE30) gained 0.79%, French CAC 40 (FR40) added 0.72%, Spanish IBEX 35 (ES35) decreased by 0.03%, British FTSE 100 (UK100) increased by 0.19%. Monday’s data showed that inflation in Germany reached another all-time high (7.4% → 7.9% y/y), while Spanish CPI data was also higher than estimated (8.3% → 8.7% y/y). France and Italy will also release their data today, and then the Eurozone CPI data will be updated. Analysts expect inflation in Europe to rise from 7.5% to 7.8% y/y. The ECB will hold a monetary policy meeting next week. Therefore, if Eurozone inflation is higher than expected today, the ECB may decide to act more aggressively. ECB President Christine Lagarde said last week that the Central Bank’s deposit rate should start to rise in July, and a significant rise in the Eurozone consumer price index could strengthen the case for an aggressive rate hike. Also, today there will be other important data on Europe to pay attention to. In particular, GDP data for the last quarter.
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At the close of the stock market on Friday, the Dow Jones Index (US30) gained 1.76% (+5.79% for the week), and the S&P 500 Index (US500) added 2.47% (+6.09% for the week). The Technology Index NASDAQ (US100) jumped by 3.33% (+6.45% for the week). All three indices ended the week in the green territory. The latest economic data, and comments of the Fed officials contributed to the positivity. The Core PCE index, part of the Fed’s inflation measures, was 4.9% y/y in April versus 5.2% y/y in March. This is the first decline in the index in 17 months. When viewed in context with other measures of inflation, this may indicate that US inflation is slowing. This is a good sign that the Fed might not have to tighten monetary policy after the summer meetings. And that’s a positive for stock indices.
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This week promises to be volatile due to a lot of important events. The US Nonfarm Payrolls is the main event of the week, as it is one of the most important parameters for the Fed’s monetary policy decision. Economists believe the US employment report remains robust in May. The Eurozone is to release its latest inflation estimate on Tuesday, with economists expecting the consumer price index to hit another record high of 7.7% in May, up from 7.4% in April. The Bank of Canada will hold an interest rate meeting. Analysts predict that the bank will raise the rate by 0.5%. As a rule, rising interest rates is accompanied by a strengthening of the national currency. Investors should also keep a close eye on the monthly OPEC+ meeting, which greatly impacts oil pricing.
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Stronger quarterly results from retailers and a rally in tech-led stocks ended their longest weekly losing streak since 1932. The US indices traded higher yesterday. As the stock market closed, the Dow Jones Index (US30) added 1.61%, and the S&P 500 Index (US500) increased by 1.99%. NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) jumped by 2.68%. US GDP fell by 1.5% in the first quarter, worse than expected. Initial jobless claims fell to 210,000 (-8,000 for the week). The US GDP decline amid a strengthening labor market points to pre-recession signs. On the other hand, the decline in GDP is due to the fact that the US spent more on imports than other countries on US exports. This led to a trade deficit, which contributed to the contraction of GDP. US pending home sales fell by 3.9% in April. This is the sixth consecutive month of decline. As mortgage rates rise, analysts predict existing home sales will decline 9% in 2022, and home price growth will drop to 5% by the end of the year.
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US indices were positive yesterday. By the close of the stock market, the Dow Jones index (US30) gained 0.60%, and the S&P 500 index (US500) added 0.95%. NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) jumped by 1.51%. The FOMC protocol confirmed that most participants are prone to raise rates by 50 basis points at their next two meetings, but after that, the Fed is likely to pause for a potential reassessment of the pace of tightening. The protocol also states that the Fed will begin cutting its balance sheet on June 1 at a rate of $47.5 billion per month.
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US indices were trading yesterday without a single trend. By the close of trading, the Dow Jones index (US30) added 0.15%, while the S&P 500 index (US500) decreased by 0.81%. The NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) lost 2.35%. A Bank of America managers survey showed that investors are becoming increasingly bearish on tech stocks as the US shows more signs of a recession. Monthly new home sales in the United States fell to a two-year low in April, reinforcing the notion of a slowing housing market due to rising interest and mortgage rates.
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At the close of the stock market yesterday, the Dow Jones index (US30) increased by 1.98%, and the S&P 500 index (US500) added 1.86%. The technology index NASDAQ (US100) gained 0.30% on Monday. US President Joe Biden said he was ready to enter into a military conflict with China “in case of an invasion” of Taiwan. In turn, the Chinese Foreign Ministry responded: “Taiwan is an inalienable part of China’s territory. The Taiwan issue is a purely internal affair for China. China has no room for compromise or concession on issues touching on its core interests of sovereignty and territorial integrity. No one should underestimate the firm resolve, staunch will, and strong ability of the Chinese people in defending national sovereignty and territorial integrity”.
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According to former Morgan Stanley Asia chairman Stephen Roche, stagflation in the US is inevitable. He warns that the US is on a dangerous path that leads to higher prices combined with slower economic growth. “The markets are not even close to discounting the full extent of what’s going to be required to bring the demand side under control… That underscores the deep hole Jerome Powell is in right now.”
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Investors will focus this week on FOMC minutes to get more information on the US central bank’s reaction to soaring inflation. US personal income and spending data, which the Fed considers to adjust policy, will also be an important economic event. The UK and Europe manufacturing PMI data should also focus on traders. Investors should also closely monitor the New Zealand Reserve Bank meeting as RBNZ plans to aggressively raise interest rates through the end of the year.
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Major US indices continued to fall yesterday as investors continue to fear that a rate hike by the Federal Reserve to fight rapid inflation will lead to a recession in the economy. The US stock market saw another sell-off yesterday. At the close of the stock market, the Dow Jones Index (US30) decreased by 0.75%, the S&P 500 Index (US500) lost 0.58%, and the NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) fell by 0.26%.
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The Federal Reserve will raise interest rates non-stop and even slow the US economy if necessary to reduce inflation from its current 40-year highs. Record high fuel prices accelerate inflation and could eventually lead to lower energy demand as consumers find it increasingly difficult to pay those prices. US economic growth this year is likely to be 2.4%, about 0.8% below the Fed’s estimate, as the war in Ukraine causes more global negative shocks than expected, S&P Global said in its forecast.
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US retail sales data came in better than expected and industrial production increased for the fourth month in a row. The solid economic data was released just hours before Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell pledged to keep raising rates until inflation cools down. GDP forecasts at the start of the second quarter point to a US economic recovery. Analysts expect US economic activity to rebound in the second quarter.
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Investors’ fears of a slowdown in the US economic growth increased after New York’s manufacturing activity fell by 36.2 points to -11.6 in May. Former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said that current Fed leaders have been too slow in responding to rising US inflation and as a result have faced a period of stagflation (a combination of stagnant growth and high inflation). According to Bernanke, Powell and his colleagues decided to respond to rising inflation gradually because they did not want to shock markets with a repeat of the so-called tantrum in 2013 when Treasury yields rose sharply under his leadership. At the same time, he warned that the result of this slow reaction would be poor economic performance.
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The week ahead finds a busy economic calendar alongside a series of Fed and ECB appearances that remain in focus given uncertainties over the pace of monetary policy tightening in the US and the EU. Both US and China will update retail sales and industrial production figures for April. In Europe, eurozone Q1 GDP and inflation numbers will be published. Also, the UK, Japan, and Canada will update the inflation data for April.
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More and more economic experts believe that the Federal Reserve’s plan to curb inflation may lead to a recession in the economy. To fight inflation, the Fed has launched its most aggressive monetary tightening campaign in decades, planning multiple rate hikes of half a percent in a row and $9 trillion in cuts to its balance sheet. But this tightening campaign is causing cracks in financial markets and steep increases in mortgage rates and other forms of borrowing. This could lead to an economic crisis in the coming months and put pressure on the Fed, both because of inflation and the negative side effects of higher rates. The Economic data is also not encouraging. The US producer price index, also called “factory” inflation or wholesale inflation, increased to 11% in annual terms. Last month’s growth was 0.5%. According to many analysts, the producer price index is a more accurate indicator of the inflation faced by businesses and retailers that suffers the most from supply chain disruptions. The initial jobless claims increased to 203,000 (+1,000 for the last week). A strong labor market amid rising inflation is the first sign of an impending recession. Such signals scare investors enough to sell off their portfolios, which leads to a decrease in stock indices. At the close of the stock market yesterday, the Dow Jones Index (US30) decreased by 0.33%, the S&P 500 (US500) lost 0.13%, and the NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) fell by 0.06%.
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The Dow Jones Index (US30) fell to a fresh yearly low yesterday as CPI data showed that inflation remains near a 40-year high. The US inflation rate fell to 8.3% from 8.5%, but the data was worse than analysts’ expectations of 8.1%. Fed officials indicate that inflation has been more resilient, and more action may be needed. Last week, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said that the Fed is not seriously considering a 75 basis point hike at its next two meetings. But after yesterday’s inflation report, policymakers’ opinions may change. Persistent inflation in the US has increased investors’ fears about an aggressive monetary policy tightening, so the stock market saw another sell-off yesterday.
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Yesterday, the US indices traded cautiously and had no unified dynamics. By the close of the stock market, the Dow Jones index (US30) decreased by 0.26%, the S&P 500 index (US500) added 0.25%, and the NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) jumped 0.98%. According to hedge fund strategists, investors are looking for signs of a potential peak in inflationary pressures, and if today’s data shows a decline in consumer prices, stock indices will show a strong rally. On the other hand, if the inflation data are worse than expected or there is a new acceleration of inflation, the stock market may see a strong sell-off.
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Credit Suisse last week lowered its forecast for the S&P 500 Index. Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Bank of America Corp., and Morgan Stanley also forecast that the stock market will struggle this year. The Federal Reserve is in the midst of a cycle of aggressive rate hikes that are expected to put pressure on US corporate earnings and economic growth. This is already weakening the support of the stock market, causing stock indices to decline steadily for weeks, while the dollar index shows growth. At the close of the stock market yesterday, the Dow Jones index (US30) decreased by 1.99%, the S&P 500 index (US500) lost 3.20%, and the NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) fell by 4.29% on Monday.
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Last week, the Nasdaq (US100) and S&P 500 (US500) indices fell for the fifth week in a row and the Dow Jones Industrial Average (US30) for the sixth. This is the longest losing streak for the S&P 500 since mid-2011 and the Nasdaq since late 2012. Investors are concerned that aggressive tightening by the Fed could lead the economy to recession. As the stock market closed on Friday, the Dow Jones index (US30) decreased by 0.30% (-0.24% for the week), the S&P 500 (US500) lost 0.57% (-0.18% for the week), and the NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) fell by 1.40% on Friday and became the fall leader (-1.52%) for the week.
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This week will be less eventful than the previous one. The main event will be the CPI data (inflation rate) in the United States. Analysts forecast a slowdown in inflation year on year from 8.5% to 8.1%. If the data is worse than expected, the stock market may react negatively. On Wednesday, China will also release inflation data, which will show the impact of the Covid-19 lockdown on the world’s second-largest economy. Investors should also focus on the speeches of the Fed and the ECB officials. It should also be noted that financial markets are now very sensitive to news about the war in Ukraine and the situation in the oil market.
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On Thursday, US stock indices ended with a decline amid participants rethinking the outcome of the Federal Reserve’s meeting in May. Hedge fund strategists believe Jerome Powell was hawkish on Wednesday, causing the US dollar to return to an uptrend yesterday and the stock market to see its biggest daily drop of the year. After the stock market closed yesterday, the Dow Jones Index (US30) lost 3.12%, the S&P 500 Index (US500) decreased by 3.56%, and the technology index NASDAQ (US100) fell by 4.99%. At the same time, the day before, the indices showed the highest rise since 2020.
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The Federal Reserve raised interest rates for the second time this year. As expected, the increase was 0.5%. But Chairman Jerome Powell eased investors’ fears of more aggressive rate hikes in future meetings. This gave investors great optimism, leading to a surge in major stock indices. After the stock market closed yesterday, the Dow Jones Index (US30) increased by 2.81%, the S&P 500 (US500) added 2.99%, and the technology index NASDAQ (US100) jumped by 3.19%.
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Today the Federal Reserve will announce its interest rate decision and publish its monetary policy minutes. Wall Street has a broad consensus that the central bank will raise the benchmark interest rate by 50 basis points to reduce rising inflationary pressures. This would be the second adjustment during the current tightening cycle but the first non-standard increase since early 2000. But this will not surprise the market since the March FOMC meeting minutes showed that “many participants would prefer a 50 basis point hike.” Special attention should be paid to the press conference at which Jerome Powell will talk about the future outlook for the economy. If the future outlook is unfavorable, the dollar index may see a new upward momentum while the stock market decreases. If the outlook is favorable, the dollar index could fall sharply, and the stock market could jump as a negative scenario already in prices.
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Increased inflationary pressures caused by the war in Ukraine, as well as supply chain problems related to the pandemic and restrictions in China, have helped raise bond rates and strengthened expectations of Federal Reserve policy tightening. Investors continue to expect more and more central banks to tighten monetary policy in response to high inflation.
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Last week ended with reports from major tech companies, which should largely determine the future of US indices. Facebook, Qualcomm, Microsoft, and Apple showed positive reports. Google and Amazon showed negative reports. As a result, markets closed last week with a loss. Economic prospects are still overshadowed by concerns about the economic impact of the war in Ukraine, rising bond yields, new coronavirus restrictions in China, which could hinder hamper improving global supply chains, and more aggressive monetary policy tightening by the Federal Reserve. At the close of the stock market on Friday, the Dow Jones Index (US30) decreased by 2.77% (-2.24% for the week, -5.57% for the month), and the S&P 500 Index (US500) lost 3.63% (-2.90% for the week, -9.84% for the month). The technology index NASDAQ (US100) fell by 4.17% on Friday (-3.25% for the week, -15.12% for the month).
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This week promises to be volatile due to several important events. The US Nonfarm Payrolls is the week’s main event, as it is one of the most important parameters for the Fed’s monetary policy decision. Economists believe the US employment report in April remains robust. Traders should pay special attention to the interest rate decisions of the Bank of England and the Reserve Bank of Australia. Analysts expect to see higher interest rates in both. As a rule, rising interest rates are accompanied by the strengthening of the national currency and the stock market’s weakness. Investors should also keep an eye on the monthly OPEC+ meeting, which will strongly impact oil pricing. Traders should also not forget about the US earning season. Investors still believe that the reporting season will keep the US market from falling. Companies such as Pfizer, AMD, Starbucks, Airbnb, Booking, Uber, Moderna, Alibaba, and others will report this week.
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The US stock indices traded without a single trend yesterday. By the end of the trading day, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (US30) increased by 0.59%, the S&P 500 Index (US500) decreased by 0.06%, and the Nasdaq Technology Index (US100) lost 1.33%. Meanwhile, the Dow Jones (US30) and S&P 500 (US500) indices made new all-time highs during the trading session but showed declines after the news. The US manufacturing PMI data for December was weak (58.7 vs. 61.1 last month). Typically, an index above 50 reflects growth in the manufacturing sector and vice versa, so at the moment, analysts believe that the US manufacturing sector is stable, despite the decline in numbers.
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The US stock indices closed in the green zone yesterday, while the dollar index also increased sharply. It is quite rare when both the major stock indices and the dollar are rising simultaneously. At the close of the stock market, the Dow Jones Index (US30) increased by 0.68%, the S&P 500 Index (US500) added 0.65%, and the NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) jumped by 1.2%. But analysts do not expect this year to be as successful for the US stock market as the previous one.
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The US stock market closed the last trading day of the year with a decrease. Dow Jones index (US30) fell by 0.16% (+1.07% for the week, +4.90% for the month, +20.23% for the year), S&P 500 (US500) decreased by 0.26% (+0.68% for the week, +4.13% for the month, +28.79% for the year) and the NASDAQ Technology Index (US100) lost 0.61% (-0.33% for the week, +1.71% for the month, +23.20% for the year). For the first time since 2001, all 11 sectors of the S&P 500 index showed double-digit gains, with the S&P 500 index (US500) outperforming the NASDAQ index (US100) by year-end for the first time since 2016.
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At the end of yesterday’s trading session, major US indices closed in small declines. The Dow Jones index (US30) decreased by 0.25%, the S&P 500 (US500) lost 0.30%, and the Nasdaq (US100) decreased by 0.16%. But despite the slight decline, the Dow Jones (US30) and the S&P 500 (US500) made new highs on Thursday on the back of the positive labor market statistics. The number of new jobless claims in the USA amounted to 198,000, while analysts expected the figure of 206,000. This is the lowest value since the pandemic began, and this data gave optimism to investors that a new wave of infections will not be able to stop the economic recovery.
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